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War on Terrorism:Limit Google Maps and Google Earth

Google maps and terroism

The lawmaker from California, USA, Joel Anderson introduced a bill regulating the level of detail in the images shown on Google Maps and Google Earth.

The spirit of this measure is to prevent terrorists using this free service to locate potential targets for attacks. In fact we know this and other similar practices are that are used by terrorists.

If the law was approved ,it will censor places like schools,Temples, government buildings and hospitals,these images appear to be distorted and in some cases they will not appear.


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“We heard from terrorists involved in the Mumbai attacks last year that they used Google Maps to select their targets and get knowledge about their targets. Hamas has said they were using Google Maps to target children’s schools,”

“What my bill does is limit the level of detail [in Google Earth]. It doesn’t stop people from getting directions. We don’t need to help bad people map their next target. What is the purpose of showing air ducts and elevator shafts? It does no good,”said Anderson (Assemblyman).

So far Google has been quite receptive to the law, and is willing to meet with legislators to discuss these ideas:

“We are happy to speak with Assemblyman Anderson’s office regarding this legislation and hope to have a productive conversation,” she added. “Google Maps and Google Earth provide users with a rich, immersive experience, offering useful information and enabling greater understanding of a specific location or area,” said Elaine Filadelfo, a spokeswoman for Google.

Anderson also added that he is not against the online mapping: “I’m not talking about blacking out places, but to change the level of detail. ” Just because the knowledge is there, does not mean that information is helpful. ”

If approved this law in principle only affect the state of California, but Anderson is hopeful that something will be transformed into a national level.

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via :Computerworld

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